• A Holiday in Venice A Holiday in Venice

    A Holiday in Venice

    September 2017

    This year we chose Venice for our family holiday. We stayed on the Lido so that we could achieve the right balance between beach and culture and keep everybody happy. I have not been to Venice for several years...

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  • Where does your Chicken cross the Road? Where does your Chicken cross the Road?

    Where does your Chicken Cross the Road?

    August 2017

    “Why did the chicken cross the road?” is not a great joke. What interests me more is where the chicken crosses the road in people’s minds. When asked the question, what do you imagine?

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  • The RIBA’s Traditional Architecture Group The RIBA’s Traditional Architecture Group

    The RIBA’s Traditional Architecture Group

    July 2017

    I have recently taken on the chairmanship of the Traditional Architecture Group (TAG). This society was formed fifteen years ago, as a linked group to the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA)...

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  • Last Thoughts on Dalibor Vesely Last Thoughts on Dalibor Vesely

    Last Thoughts on Dalibor Vesely

    June 2017

    Dalibor Vesely (1934-2015) is the subject of legend at Cambridge University. He was my diploma tutor at the Faculty of Architecture, where he taught during the 80s and 90s.

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  • Treasures of the V&A #1 Treasures of the V&A #1

    Treasures of the V&A #1

    May 2017

    The V & A is, without a doubt, my favourite museum. I enjoy wandering around with no particular purpose, looking at whatever objects catch my eye. Sometimes I find new gems; other times I enjoy returning to familiar pieces...

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  • Fort Worth Fort Worth

    Fort Worth, an Urban Renaissance

    April 2017

    Last February I went on a tour organised by the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art and saw the tremendous work done in Forth Worth, a city in North Central Texas. Over a long period, sound urban principles have had an astonishing effect on the town...

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  • The Making of the Erechtheion Capital The Making of the Erechtheion Capital

    The Making of the Erechtheion Capital

    March 2017

    One of the most universally adored details of all classical architecture is the Ionic capital at the Erechtheion on the north side of the Acropolis, built between 421 and 406 BC. Phidias was both sculptor and mason of the structure and was employed by Pericles...

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  • Glad to be Pastiche Glad to be Pastiche

    Glad to be Pastiche

    February 2017

    The definition of Pastiche is 'an artistic work in a style that imitates that of another work, artist, or period.' I imitate historic buildings, rather than inventing new styles, and with this in mind, it may seem fair game to direct the word at my work...

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  • Pretty Buildings Pretty Buildings

    Pretty Buildings

    January 2017

    Architects are always presumed to be good at maths and physics. This suggests that people feel the primary role of an architect is to make a building stand up, which is curious because architect in the UK are not licenced to carry out this task. Perhaps architects are to blame...

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  • How Palladian were Palladians? How Palladian were Palladians?

    How Palladian were Palladians?

    December 2016

    As a practicing classical architect, I have had a number of clients who have wanted their houses to look like the work of the English Palladians of the Georgian era rather than Palladio himself. From this I started to notice that the work of the English Palladians...

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  • National Archives, Washington D.C. by John Russell Pope (Photo by Tom Noble) National Archives, Washington D.C. by John Russell Pope (Photo by Tom Noble)

    My Kind of Town: Washington DC

    September 2016

    In the early 1990s, Washington DC was not just the capital, but also the murder capital, of the United States. Despite this, I found it a surprisingly enjoyable place to live, when I spent the year out before my diploma there, working for the eminent classical architect Allan Greenberg...

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  • Fortune Favours the Friendly Fortune Favours the Friendly

    Fortune Favours the Friendly

    July 2015

    On occasions I meet architects who think that they are, or more often should be, 'in charge' of every aspect of their buildings. These people are either very naive or deluded. They harp back to a golden age when architects were taken seriously like doctors or lawyers...

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  • Palladio: The One Trick Pony by Francis Terry Palladio: The One Trick Pony by Francis Terry

    Palladio: The One Trick Pony

    January 2009

    Palladio-mania is just going too far. Last year I was invited to two Palladio parties on the same evening, one was at the RIBA and the other at the Italian Embassy. Wherever I look I see articles, symposiums, exhibitions, publications, parties and even a church service...

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  • Quinlan and Francis Terry sketching in Ascoli Piceno, Italy, 1983 Quinlan and Francis Terry sketching in Ascoli Piceno, Italy, 1983

    Sketching with my Father

    2005

    Sketching with my father is the corner stone of my architectural education and from about the age of ten my parents took me to see the great master pieces of European architecture. In each city we visited, my father and I would spend the day sketching...

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