• Designing a New Kitchen in our Regency House Designing a New Kitchen in our Regency House

    Designing a New Kitchen in our Regency House

    November 2019

    Earlier this year, Country Life, Historic Houses and Neptune launched a competition to celebrate the best new kitchens in old spaces. Our recently completed kitchen fits this brief perfectly and we are thrilled to be shortlisted down to the last three.

    Read more

  • Why does my Puppy like Mozart? Why does my Puppy like Mozart?

    Why does my Puppy like Mozart?

    (And what does this tell us about classical architecture?)

    October 2019

    We recently bought a puppy and discovered that he much prefers classical music to pop. It seems that dogs are born with discernible musical tastes which effects their moods and this seems to be consistent throughout the species.

    Read more

  • St Andrew’s Felixstowe – The Last Wool Church St Andrew’s Felixstowe – The Last Wool Church

    St Andrew’s Felixstowe – The Last Wool Church

    September 2019

    St Andrew’s, Felixstowe is an uncharacteristic early work by Erith designed between 1929 and 1930. He worked in collaboration with Hilda Mason, who, as the older architect was probably the dominant force in the project.

    Read more

  • Architect in Wonderland Architect in Wonderland

    Architect in Wonderland

    August 2019

    When I was growing up I was unsure about whether I wanted to be an architect or an artist. Over a summer holiday, in my late teens, I painted my younger sister’s bedroom with scenes from Alice in Wonderland.

    Read more

  • The Platonic House The Platonic House

    The Platonic House

    May 2019

    Many award-winning houses and those seen on ‘Grand Designs’ often look like space ships or abstract sculpture, which I am sure are worthy in their own way, but they do not look like houses. Is this a problem?

    Read more

  • L'amour de l'Architecture Française L'amour de l'Architecture Française

    L'amour de l'Architecture Française

    April 2019

    Over the years I have noticed that clients seem to favour French classicism over Italian. Because of this, I have been sent on several trips to Paris to study and measure buildings – it’s a tough job but someone’s got to do it!

    Read more

  • Happy Birthday Mr Lutyens Happy Birthday Mr Lutyens

    Happy Birthday Mr Lutyens

    March 2019

    As everyone knows, the 29th March this year is a big day in European politics, but, if like me, you feel bored by the process and anxious by the result; might I suggest celebrating 150th Lutyens’s birthday, which coincidentally is on the same day?

    Read more

  • An Introduction to Baroque Architecture An Introduction to Baroque Architecture

    An Introduction to Baroque Architecture

    February 2019

    This is a lecture I gave to the office about the baroque movement in architecture. It follows on from a lecture I gave about the renaissance and is the precursor to a future lecture on neoclassicism.

    Read more

  • Should Architects Just Do as They Are Told? Should Architects Just Do as They Are Told?

    Should Architects Just Do as They Are Told?

    January 2019

    How much should I, as an architect, push my opinions? Should I simply take instructions from clients and blindly obey, or should I insist on buildings being a particular way?

    Read more

  • A Quick Trip to Ireland A Quick Trip to Ireland

    A Quick Trip to Ireland

    December 2018

    A few weeks ago I was asked to show an ICAA tour around a house in Ireland. I caught a late flight to Ireland on a Sunday night. I then had to hire a car and drove for over an hour. Eventually, I arrived at Roundwood House.

    Read more

  • What Informs Architectural Taste? What Informs Architectural Taste?

    What Informs Architectural Taste?

    November 2018

    Taste is a curious thing and I have often wondered how it works. Things considered tasteful can stop being tasteful, seemingly for no apparent reason, but there must be more to it than that.

    Read more

  • Stowe Revisited Stowe Revisited

    Stowe Revisited

    October 2018

    School reunions can be stressful, 'dress informal' says the invitation, but how informal? At least they didn’t demand 'smart casual' – whatever that is. After much indecision, I headed west to Stowe, my old school.

    Read more

  • What Is More Important, Materials or Form? What Is More Important, Materials or Form?

    What Is More Important, Materials or Form?

    September 2018

    Palladio's villas in the Veneto are made from render which is a cheaper alternative to stone, but it looks similar from a distance ... I think even if the Villa Rotonda was made of cheese, it would still look splendid from afar.

    Read more

  • Jefferson’s University of Virginia Jefferson’s University of Virginia

    Jefferson’s University of Virginia

    July 2018

    Jefferson was a great architect because he had an instinct for elegant phasing, which is the essence of all good architecture. His design of the University of Virginia in Charlottesville is an exceptional work of architecture.

    Read more

  • An Introduction to the Architecture of the Italian Renaissance An Introduction to the Architecture of the Italian Renaissance

    An Introduction to the Architecture of the Italian Renaissance

    May 2018

    Instead of a blog this month, I have posted a video of my ‘in house’ office lecture about the Italian Renaissance. This lecture covers one of the greatest outbursts of creativity in the history of western art and architecture.

    Read more

  • Sustainable Building Materials Sustainable Building Materials

    Sustainable Building Materials

    April 2018

    A good pair of brogues will last decades. Trainers will not. Nylon, as used in sports clothing, seems to be the 'go-to' fabric nowadays, unless you are a reactionary architect who peddles nostalgia - like me.

    Read more

  • Designing for the Wingless Designing for the Wingless

    Designing for the Wingless

    March 2018

    The gull sees a site plan, but the human sees a setting for their life carried out on the ground. Seeing from both points of view is a daily challenge for any architect or master planner.

    Read more

  • The Temple of Ilissus The Temple of Ilissus

    The Temple of Ilissus

    February 2018

    This year, a client commissioned me to draw an ionic capital. Doing a drawing of this scale is something I rarely have time to do and it was fortunate to be given the opportunity.

    Read more

  • The Pantheon - The Greatest Building in the World The Pantheon - The Greatest Building in the World

    The Pantheon - The Greatest Building in the World

    January 2018

    When asked what I view as the greatest building in the world, I say 'The Pantheon' - without a shadow of a doubt. It is an amazing survivor from the ancient world, which still has the power to move almost everyone who stands under its 'most majestic canopy.'

    Read more

  • Berlin and Potsdam Berlin and Potsdam

    Berlin and Potsdam

    November 2017

    Berlin is a great place to visit for a few days. The city is a manageable scale full of fascinating museums, superb architecture and hundreds of lovely and varied restaurants.

    Read more

  • Poundbury Poundbury

    Poundbury

    October 2017

    Poundbury in Dorset is a new town designed by a variety of architects under a master plan by Leon Krier. Earlier this month I was invited there, to guide a tour from the ICAA.

    Read more

  • A Holiday in Venice A Holiday in Venice

    A Holiday in Venice

    September 2017

    This year we chose Venice for our family holiday. We stayed on the Lido so that we could achieve the right balance between beach and culture and keep everybody happy. I have not been to Venice for several years...

    Read more

  • Where does your Chicken Cross the Road? Where does your Chicken Cross the Road?

    Where does your Chicken Cross the Road?

    August 2017

    “Why did the chicken cross the road?” is not a great joke. What interests me more is where the chicken crosses the road in people’s minds. When asked the question, what do you imagine?

    Read more

  • The RIBA’s Traditional Architecture Group The RIBA’s Traditional Architecture Group

    The RIBA’s Traditional Architecture Group

    July 2017

    I have recently taken on the chairmanship of the Traditional Architecture Group (TAG). This society was formed fifteen years ago, as a linked group to the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA)...

    Read more

  • Last Thoughts on Dalibor Vesely Last Thoughts on Dalibor Vesely

    Last Thoughts on Dalibor Vesely

    June 2017

    Dalibor Vesely (1934-2015) is the subject of legend at Cambridge University. He was my diploma tutor at the Faculty of Architecture, where he taught during the 80s and 90s.

    Read more

  • Treasures of the V&A Treasures of the V&A

    Treasures of the V&A

    May 2017

    The V & A is, without a doubt, my favourite museum. I enjoy wandering around with no particular purpose, looking at whatever objects catch my eye. Sometimes I find new gems; other times I enjoy returning to familiar pieces...

    Read more

  • Fort Worth, an Urban Renaissance Fort Worth, an Urban Renaissance

    Fort Worth, an Urban Renaissance

    April 2017

    Last February I went on a tour organised by the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art and saw the tremendous work done in Forth Worth, a city in North Central Texas. Over a long period, sound urban principles have had an astonishing effect on the town...

    Read more

  • The Making of the Erechtheion Capital The Making of the Erechtheion Capital

    The Making of the Erechtheion Capital

    March 2017

    One of the most universally adored details of all classical architecture is the Ionic capital at the Erechtheion on the north side of the Acropolis, built between 421 and 406 BC. Phidias was both sculptor and mason of the structure and was employed by Pericles...

    Read more

  • Glad to be Pastiche Glad to be Pastiche

    Glad to be Pastiche

    February 2017

    The definition of Pastiche is 'an artistic work in a style that imitates that of another work, artist, or period.' I imitate historic buildings, rather than inventing new styles, and with this in mind, it may seem fair game to direct the word at my work...

    Read more

  • Pretty Buildings Pretty Buildings

    Pretty Buildings

    January 2017

    Architects are always presumed to be good at maths and physics. This suggests that people feel the primary role of an architect is to make a building stand up, which is curious because architect in the UK are not licenced to carry out this task. Perhaps architects are to blame...

    Read more

  • The Use of Scamozzi Ionic in Georgian Architecture The Use of Scamozzi Ionic in Georgian Architecture

    The Use of Scamozzi Ionic in Georgian Architecture

    December 2016

    As a practicing classical architect, I have had a number of clients who have wanted their houses to look like the work of the English Palladians of the Georgian era rather than Palladio himself. From this I started to notice that the work of the English Palladians...

    Read more

  • My Kind of Town: Washington DC My Kind of Town: Washington DC

    My Kind of Town: Washington DC

    September 2016

    In the early 1990s, Washington DC was not just the capital, but also the murder capital, of the United States. Despite this, I found it a surprisingly enjoyable place to live, when I spent the year out before my diploma there, working for the eminent classical architect Allan Greenberg...

    Read more

  • Fortune Favours the Friendly Fortune Favours the Friendly

    Fortune Favours the Friendly

    July 2015

    On occasions I meet architects who think that they are, or more often should be, 'in charge' of every aspect of their buildings. These people are either very naive or deluded. They harp back to a golden age when architects were taken seriously like doctors or lawyers...

    Read more

  • Palladio: The One Trick Pony Palladio: The One Trick Pony

    Palladio: The One Trick Pony

    January 2009

    Palladio-mania is just going too far. Last year I was invited to two Palladio parties on the same evening, one was at the RIBA and the other at the Italian Embassy. Wherever I look I see articles, symposiums, exhibitions, publications, parties and even a church service...

    Read more

  • Sketching with my Father Sketching with my Father

    Sketching with my Father

    March 2005

    An essay about Francis Terry's numerous sketching holidays in Italy and other European cities with this father the classical architect Quinlan Terry CBE.

    Read more